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April 2016 – Newsletter

Graduation 2016
On April 16th Willowbank celebrated it's 8th graduation. Pictured left to right: Dean of Faculty Julian Smith, Angus Affleck, Jeremy Bridge, Leena Ceylan, Theresa Felicetti, Katie Hollingshead, Sherri Koabel, Lita Ratha and MPP Wayne Gates. Congrats Class of 2016!

School's out for Summer

The coming of April has brought the end of another school year, and was marked with great celebrations, fine conversations and a few rounds of farewells. Willowbank wishes all its students a happy summer break!
Class of 2016 Graduation Willowbank welcomed it's 8th graduating class to the ranks of alumni on April 16th, 2016. The beautiful day was accompanied by words of wisdom: MPP Wayne Gates welcomed the class and class representative Sherri Koabel quoted the X-Ambassadors, telling her fellow classmates, "It's our time to make a move; It's our time to make amends; It's our time to break the rules...So let's begin..." This theme was picked up by Dean of Faculty Julian Smith who urged the students to "stand up and make a difference" and to "fight for diversity" stating "you are the generation that is going to make the difference." The graduates were the first class to celebrate their graduation in the Bright Parlour. The ceremony was an intimate gathering of friends and family, who retired to Reif Hall for refreshments before touring the grounds. Willowbank now boasts over 50 graduates, and looks forward to reporting the successes of these new alumni in the years to come.
Elaine O'Sullivan will depart as School's Director in 2016-17 Continues involvement in advisory and teaching rolesElaine O'SullivanWillowbank wishes to announce that Elaine O'Sullivan will be stepping down as Director of School when the new school term begins in September 2016. A passionate advocate for Willowbank's educational programming, Elaine will be assuming her new appointment to the Willowbank Advisory Committee, and will continue to engage its students in a new teaching role as a Faculty Associate. Elaine's involvement with Willowbank began at the Italy Field School in 2013, and ever since, she has helped expand Willowbank's reach in the field of sustainable design. Primed by her graduate work at the Centre of Alternative Technology in Wales, and her experience with natural and historic building practices in Ireland, Germany and Spain, Elaine took on Willowbank's academic programme in summer 2014 having left her native Ireland to pursue a more inter-disciplinary role in the field of heritage. A cornerstone of the educational programming at Willowbank during the 2014-15 and 2015-16 school years, Elaine looks forward to continuing her engagement in her new advisory and teaching roles. She will remain in her current position on a part-time basis this upcoming summer, as we plan for the 2016-17 school year. A call for applications will be announced in the weeks to come.
Willowbank welcomes guests from Clarence House and The Prince's Charities CanadaJames Furse & Amanda SherringtonOn April 15th, Willowbank staff and students welcomed Clarence House Board Member James Furse and his wife Amanda, as well as Matthew Rowe and Amanda Sherrington from The Prince's Charities in Canada. The Prince's Charities Canada celebrated it's 5 year anniversary earlier in the week, and welcomed the Clarence House Board member and his wife to Canada as part of the anniversary proceedings. Willowbank received the patronage of His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales in 2014 and staff and students were happy to welcome their visitors, providing a tour of the grounds, hands-on demonstrations and conversations on the convergence of sustainable contemporary design, heritage places, traditional trades skills with Willowbank's alternative educational model.
Willowbank Centre's Views On A Room Symposium The Willowbank Centre hosted the Views on a Room Heritage Symposium this past weekend on Saturday, April 23rd. The all-day event featured panels on Conservation Philosophy, Interpretive Approaches and Materials and Systems considerations, and centred on a discussion of the Conservation of the Bright Parlour. The keynote address was made by special guest, Franklin Vagnone, Architect and Public Historian, of the blog twistedpreservation.com and former Director of the New York Historic House Trust. Franklin is the co-writer of the best-selling "Anarchist's Guide to Historic House Museums" and his talk did not disappoint. Franklin seeks to shake up the heritage field by refocusing on innovative programming and putting the needs of the local community at the heart of our heritage places. A big thank you to all of those who came out and participated in the event, including our wonderful panellists, our alumni moderators and our incredibly engaged audience. We look forward to building on the panels' discussions on April 30th and May 1st when students from across Canada and the US will gather at Willowbank to participate in a heritage charette on the Conservation of the Bright Parlour. The Symposium and Charette have been generously sponsored by: Heelis, Little and Almas LLP and Quartek Group Inc. While prizes for the Charette have been provided by the National Trust for Canada and the Ontario Heritage Trust.
Recipes and Remedies in Upper Canada by Hannah Peters Jarvis Edited, compiled and published by Dr. Elizabeth Oliver-Malone Remedies in Upper Canada Willowbank proudly announces that the book "Recipes and Remedies in Upper Canada" is now available. The book, compiled and edited by Dr. Elizabeth Oliver-Malone, features the recipes and remedies of Hannah Peters Jarvis, who lived at Willowbank for over 10 years, and was the mother of Hannah Owen Hamilton, the first mistress of Willowbank. Hannah Peters Jarvis, came to Canada - having been born in the United States and spending much of her youth in England - and moved to Newark as part of Governor Simcoe's government in 1792.  The book features recipes gathered between 1780 and the 1830s, and allows great and delightful insights into the life of an 'elite' woman in Upper Canada in the 19th century. Recipes include New York butter biscuits, corn pudding and preserving of meats, salmon and eggs. There are numerous recipes for ale and practical instructions for the making of cement and paint, candles and cosmetics. A pharmacopeia for children and adults, as well as remedies for cows and horses rounds out the offerings. The book was published through Gaspereau Press and is available for sale for the price of $25 (tax included) + shipping and handling, there are limited quantities available.
  All proceeds from sales go to support Willowbank.
Alumni Spotlight: Sahra Campbell, Class of 2015 Sahra Campbell Sahra came to heritage work with a background in fine arts and furniture making and an interest in the conservation of old buildings. Since graduating from Willowbank, her preference for getting her hands dirty has led her more towards site-based conservation work. In the summer leading up to her third year, she interned at Jablonski Building Conservation in New York and worked on several projects including historic paint research at St. Michael's Cathedral in Toronto and stone conservation work at Prospect Cemetery in Queens, NY. For her third year she moved to London, England. She spent the first twelve months heading the documentation team for the dismantling and restoration of the Temperate House at Kew Royal Botanic Gardens. During this time she also undertook a chemistry course for conservators, volunteered on other small projects throughout the city and learned gilding and wood carving from some talented carvers who also quickly became good friends. All of this helped her to lay the groundwork to give it a go on her own and she is now working as a freelance conservator. Working freelance has allowed her to move around on a variety of projects and work with many different people in the field, which she feels is invaluable in these early years of her career. She is currently with Hirst Conservation working on the Victorian interiors of Delapre Abbey in Northampton, where the scope of work includes sensitive cleaning, repairing of decorative plaster ceilings and cornices, researching and matching historic paint finishes, gilding and modeling/casting of lost elements. She finds the work very gratifying and is hopeful that these opportunities will continue to grow and come her way while she is in the UK.
Upcoming Events

Happy Leap Day!

Chloe, Elizabeth and Crystal
Dr. Elizabeth Oliver-Malone (centre) with her Lieutenant Governor's Ontario Heritage Trust Award for Lifetime Achievement. She is pictured with Chloe Richer (left), first year student and this year's Oliver-Malone Research, Library and Archives Fellow, and Crystal Bossio, Director of Operations and Capital Projects.
February has gone by quickly and all are happy to have the bonus day this year. Our student's Leap Day's are filled with Conservation Management Plan studies and wood window conservation classes.

Board Member Dr. Elizabeth Oliver-Malone receives the Lieutenant Governor’s Heritage Award for Lifetime Achievement

Dr. Elizabeth Oliver-Malone was awarded the Lieutenant Governor’s Heritage Award on Friday, February 26th at Queen’s Park in Toronto. Elizabeth is a founding Willowbank donor and has been a member of the Willowbank board since 2002 and has worked tirelessly in pursuit of advancing Willowbank’s School. She has been a passionate advocate for the preservation of the Hamilton history, chairing the Library, Research and Archives committee and contributing the Oliver-Malone Fellowship which supports a second year student’s archival activities. Elizabeth’s love of heritage extends beyond Willowbank - she is also a member, artifact contributor and/or volunteer to the Jordan Pioneer Museum of the Twenty and Doon Pioneer Village Museum at Kitchener, the Pennsylvania German Folklore Society of Ontario, Harmony Residents Group, Friends of Fort George, Friends of Lincoln’s History, Friends of Algonquin Park, the Col. John Butler Homestead Fund and the United Empire Loyalists’ Association among others. Elizabeth’s dedication to the social heritage of the 19th century will take published form soon, with a book entitled: Recipes and Remedies in Upper Canada. A compilation of the recipes of Hannah Jarvis, which include instruction on not just food and drink, but recipes for cement, paint, cleaners, cosmetics and medicinal remedies. The book will be available for the public to purchase from Willowbank this summer.

Successful Opening Night for the Raw and Reimagined Photo Exhibit

This past Saturday, February 27th, was the grand opening of the Raw and Reimagined Photo Exhibit. The evening was a great success with over 60 guests arriving to enjoy wine, cheese and fine photography, in support of Willowbank. Many thanks to all the amazing photographers who contributed their work to the exhibit and to our event sponsors: Constellation Brands, Roman Cheese Products and The Queenston Limestone Company. Thanks also to all of the students and staff who helped set up and run the event, especially Theresa Felicetti, a third year student, who organized the entire event. If you missed the opening night - do not fret! The Raw and Reimagined Photo Exhibit will continue to run throughout this upcoming week, and will be open February 29th to March 4th from 10am-8pm and March 5th from 1pm-4pm. The exhibit is being held in the auditorium and second floor of the Lower Campus (former Laura Secord School at 5 Walnut St., Queenston.) The exhibit draws upon the photography of our wider community, bringing together perspectives on place: what they are and what they can be!
Cleveland Trip

Cleveland Field Trip

Each year second year students choose a city to visit in order to experience how heritage is interpreted, defined and evolving in different milieus. Its a chance to be inspired by a new environment and see differing approaches to heritage. This year the students visited Cleveland, Ohio, a city that has seen its fair share of economic decline in the industrial sector but which has experienced some of the amazing creativity that has helped to make many of the other 'Rustbelt' cities bastions for culture, arts and innovative approaches to heritage. While in Cleveland the students met with city planners, visited the Urban Planning Institute and the Museums of Art and Natural History. They also visited the Cleveland quarries and shops, as well as the Briar Hill Stone Company before visiting the shop of stone carver and faculty associate Nicholas Fairplay. They rounded out the trip with a visit to the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and a tour of the Warehouse district.
Stained Glass

First Year Classes

First years had an exciting February as well! With classes in heritage carpentry, window and wood conservation, masonry conservation theory, stained glass and intangible cultural history. Students also made two field trips - one to Guelph to visit projects under the direction of Architect John Grynham, and one to Toronto to visit Wychwood Barns, Evergreen Brickworks and other adaptive reuse projects.

Open House: April 2nd, 2016

Willowbank is pleased to announce that this year's Open House will take place on April 2nd, from 12pm - 4pm. This year we are excited to be featuring a plaster demonstration and a carpentry demonstration. Staff and students will be on hand at both the Upper and Lower Campus, and will be leading tours and answering questions. This is a great opportunity to see our students in action and experience the Estate. All are welcome to drop in.

Spotlight on Alumni: Douglas Mackay

Douglas Mackay, Class of 2013, is currently an independent woodworker, specializing in the design and craft fine furniture and restoration carpentry. Douglas came to Willowbank with a background in history and an interest in quality craftsmanship. He worked in the Yukon with at risk teens immediately prior to his time at Willowbank. With this background, Douglas had and continues to have a specific interest in how culture and heritage can intersect with social justice issues, and help to improve social well-being. Upon graduation from Willowbank, Douglas went on to study at the internationally renowned Fine Woodworking program at the College of the Redwoods in California - he blogged about his experiences - here. With his specialization in fine carpentry Douglas returned to Canada to pursue a career in woodworking. Since returning to Canada he has worked on many restoration projects in Hamilton, Toronto and Montreal, as well as creating commissioned pieces for individual buyers. Doug continues to bridge wood working with social well-being and offers one-on-one woodworking classes that concentrate on mindfulness and "emphasize the fulfillment and well-being of working with your head, hands and heart in balance." Douglas can be contacted for commissioned pieces and restoration work. His website is: douglasmackay.ca.

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Winter Term is upon us

Willowbank Students 2016
Second year class preparing for François Leblanc's Contemporary Layers class presentations. Students were asked to design a contemporary intervention for a historic site. Students produced a set of design drawings, a model and present their design rationales. Their sites included the former Michigan Central Railway bridge site and the train station area in Niagara Falls, the former Laura Secord School in Queenston and the old Firehall in Thorold.

Students and staff returned from our Holiday break refreshed and well-rested for a jam packed winter term.

January Classes

January saw first year classes in everything from building code reviews to design charettes, from metal conservation to heritage carpentry. The first years finished off January with a three year class from mason Carol Jackson, who had students laying bricks and stone and trying their hands at different pointing techniques.

Second year students had are equally busy this semester as they finalize the statements of significance for their Conservation Management Plans (CMPs) and begin to pen their recommendations for the sites they are working on: the Woodland Cultural Centre, the Cave Springs Conservation Area and the East Seneca United Church. While managing the writing of their final CMP reports and presentations, second year students continue with classes which have included a Contemporary Layers and Design Aesthetics class with François Leblanc and Conservation in Developing Countries with Lori Anglin.

Lisa Prosper Departs as Willowbank Centre's Director Continues involvement in teaching and associate roles

Lisa Prosper
Lisa Prosper, former Director of the Centre for Cultural Landscape

Willowbank wishes to announce that Lisa Prosper will soon step down as Director of the Centre for Cultural Landscape. A champion for Willowbank, Lisa will continue in the roles of Centre Associate and Faculty Associate. The Centre's founding Director, Lisa has cultivated its voice in the conservation field over the past four years. She has been integral in defining Willowbank's approach to cultural landscapes, and in creating a dialogue with diverse audiences of theorists and practitioners. Her involvement in the School's diploma program has also made a lasting contribution to the curriculum. In leading the Centre, Lisa's accomplishments include convening public lectures in Queenston, Hamilton and Toronto; addressing audiences in Canada, the US, Europe and Asia; establishing a working partnership with the World Heritage Institute in Shanghai; contributing to publications; and, establishing a student fellowship in cultural landscape. Her contributions while at the Willowbank Centre were recently recognized in her election to the scientific committee on cultural landscapes of the International Council on Monuments and Sites, and to the Royal Canadian Geographical Society's college of fellows. Lisa will be pursuing new opportunities in cultural landscapes within her areas of expertise at the intersections between nature, culture and indigenous perspectives. She will continue to inspire Willowbank's diploma students and broader audiences alike in her new teaching and associate roles. A search for the Centre's new leadership will be undertaken in 2016.

Lecture Series: Telling Heritage

Willowbank's Centre is pleased to present the Winter Lecture series: Telling Heritage. Our theme this year centres on the stories we tell and how our heritage places are shaped by our cultural narratives. Our guest speakers will include: Keith Blades, Masonry Conservator; Dale Jarvis, Storyteller and Folklorist; Daniel Millette, Indigenous Architecture and Planning Specialist; Julian Smith, Architect and Dean of Faculty; Lee Maracle, Sto:Loh Storyteller and Author; and, Mark Laird, Landscape Architect and Conservator. Lectures will run throughout the winter term and tickets are $25 per lecture or $120 for all six.

Juliana Glassco: Notes from a Third Year Student Intern

One of our third year students, Juliana Glassco, has been working at the UNESCO offices in Paris for her third year internship. This remarkable opportunity has provided Juliana with a first hand experience in the world of International Heritage. Juliana's experiences have covered projects relating to World Heritage property management and conservation; Historic Urban Landscape-based planning approaches, defining and identifying urban heritage, Heritage and Environmental Impact Assessments, and the UN Sustainable Development Goals. While in Paris, Juliana has been fortunate to meet with both theorists and practitioners in the conservation fields including heritage architects, and traditional French stonemasons as well as attending the Annual Heritage Expo. On her list of must-dos before her tenure is up in Paris, is to visit the Chateau de Guedolon, a new castle that is being built using medieval construction techniques. Juliana came to Willowbank with a background in anthropology and public history and was our 2014-15 Susan Buggey Cultural Landscape Fellow. She will be exploring the opportunities for remaining in Europe after her internship at UNESCO finishes in March.

Spotlight on Alumni: Ashleigh Bell

Ashleigh Bell, Class of 2013, is currently with the Tourism & Culture division of the City of Hamilton where she coordinates capital projects on municipally-owned cultural facilities, museums and historic sites. Outside of her full-time position, Ashleigh is involved with a number of community and professional organizations, including the Hamilton Community Land Trust and the Hamilton-Burlington Society of Architects, for which she has coordinated two educational series on conservation discourse. She also teaches Architecture in Canada and Architectural Styles courses with first years and Historic Interiors with second years in the Diploma program. Ashleigh came to Willowbank with a background in contemporary interior design. After a few years of working in commercial firms across Canada, she had become frustrated with common building practice, feeling that industrial consumerism and pop sensationalism all too often corrupts designers and builders to forget our fundamental human need for beauty in our environment. Ashleigh’s family roots in rural Nova Scotia have instilled in her a deep respect for historic places, traditional building crafts and architecture that exists in harmony with natural landscape. Her desire to focus on sustainable, conscious design that reflects these values led her to the Heritage Conservation program, which in turn has allowed her to finally integrate her personal philosophies with professional design and project management work.

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